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How to Work Smarter: Digging Deep to Create a Truly Meaningful Journey for Clients

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The Whole Truth Episode 36

Kurt Dupuis:
Welcome to The Whole Truth where two wholesalers help financial professionals build great practices and thrive in a rapidly changing industry. We'll bring you the stories and voices from those on the front lines of this change. And we'll have some fun along the way.

Steve Seid:
This is more than a podcast. We're building a community of financial professionals who are growing, forward thinking and want to get better. Thanks for listening and contributing to the discussion.

Disclosure:
The views expressed herein are those of the participants and not those of Touchstone Investments.

Steve Seid:
And welcome everybody to the whole truth from the Bay Area, California. I am Steve Seid.

Kurt Dupuis:
And from Atlanta, Georgia, I am Kurt Dupuis.

Steve Seid:
How are you buddy?

Kurt Dupuis:
I'm good. I'm really good.

Steve Seid:
Good episode today. Feeling good.

Kurt Dupuis:
This stretched just a bit. I think this stretched us outside of our comfort zones.

Steve Seid:
This might have been, and probably the audience will appreciate it, probably the episode I will be most quiet on, maybe they need like a break from my taking over conversations and running on tangents. But the topic today was focused on marketing and journeys. And I just kind of sat back and listened a lot here because it's not my area of expertise. But I think it's a really, really awesome topic. Our guest today was Alejandra Slatapolsky. I think I pronounced that correct. That's pretty good.

Kurt Dupuis:
That was not bad.

Steve Seid:
It's pretty good.

Kurt Dupuis:
She is a good porteña for which means she's from Buenos Aires. So reaching back into my past life of international sales, it was fun to talk about all things Argentina. That's one of my favorite countries.

Steve Seid:
That was another thing that was out of my element, still have never been to South America. That's one I must, must, must.

Kurt Dupuis:
Yeah we got to fix that.

Steve Seid:
Yeah. So she runs an organization, a marketing organization called Scalto. She's been in marketing for a really, really long time. She also hosts a podcast, The Biz of Wealth. She reached out to us, engaged with us regarding our show, how we started, we started to learn about her, it turned to a really great discussion.

Kurt Dupuis:
The trigger word was something that we've discussed internally, which is creating a journey for clients. And I think we, internally, we had discussed journeys as either like new clients or prospective clients, but she had a really good way of thinking about tying the whole. So existing clients should also have a journey. We should be cultivating an experience for them.

Steve Seid:
Yeah. And thinking about every little part of that journey. That was the key takeaway. So you have a prospect, he or she comes in, what do they experience meeting one, meeting two, meeting three, however long that prospect experience lasts? Like, what do you do when that prospect experience drags on? What do you do when they're a new client, when they're an onboarding? As well as the clients that have been here for 10, 20 years, we should think about what they experience from us as well. So I just thought it's an incredible topic and something that we should probably dig into a lot more after this.

And the second takeaway was depth. So you got to a point in marketing where you're saying we should do this or we should focus on this or this client expects this. She kept saying, "What I'll do to my clients is ask why. And then they'll answer and I'll go, why again." And by continuing to do that like sort of forceful why questioning you get to a whole other level of insight, typically, that helps in marketing.

Kurt Dupuis:
Yeah. Bring out your inner two-year-old, just ask why about everything. But it had this carryover effect. Like niche marketing, she's like, "Well, “Doctors” is just not a niche." Just keep drilling down. Dr. Crosby said niches get riches and she just doubled down on that. Also, when it comes to your own value proposition, again, just go deeper. So she was big on the whys.

Steve Seid:
So a great interview. Thank you for Alejandra for coming on to our show. Do us a favor, anyone listening, you like the show, share it with a friend, hit subscribe, give us that five star review, make a comment all that stuff gets us in front of more people. And we have big, big, big growth plans for the show in 2022, so we'd really, really appreciate that. So without further ado, here's our interview with Alejandra.

Kurt Dupuis:
And today, we are excited to welcome Alejandra. And it's going to be everything I can do to not throw Seid off and interject a little bit of Spanish in here. But one of the things I was excited to learn is that you are porteña, from Buenos Aires. Argentina is a country that is very near and dear to my heart. Do you have a couple of wine, good Mendoza wine recommendations, brands that you like?

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
Of course. Malbec, you have the Alamos. I'm not that big a wine person, but Alamos ... You put me on the spot there. What's the other name that everybody loves?

Steve Seid:
He tends to do that.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
Coppola. Really good.

Kurt Dupuis:
Coppola. I know what I'll be looking at the store next time I go. But as we often do, we feel like people are often better at telling their own background and their own Introductions better than us. So why don't you give the audience just a sense of your background, I know you have some moving parts with the companies that you're associated with. So just tell us a little bit about yourself.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
Okay. So, as you said, I'm Argentinian. I have a background in PR and marketing and actually journalism. And when I came to this country many years ago, I specialized in financial services. Well, actually, my whole life, my family comes from financial services. So I merged those two passions, communications and financial services, and that has been my career, basically. I've helped financial services and now FinTech companies with their outreach to their clients, with the outreach to their prospects and with growth strategies.

My company used to be Slata, which was the company launched eight years ago, and now I merged with another agency called Scalto. With a new partner, we launched Scalto. And Scalto focuses on helping clients with scalability strategies, how to scale from a marketing and communications standpoint. And that means a ton about a word we spoke a lot that is analyzing customer journeys, and working on how to better serve your clients, get more referrals, and just wow them so that your business grows without more hours in your day.

Kurt Dupuis:
Are you B2B or B2C? So are you working with financial professionals directly?

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
It has been both. I've always worked mostly with B2B companies, actually. The B2C strategy sometimes are more straightforward. Scaling B2B strategies is a bigger challenge. My background comes from investment banking, asset management, brokerage, all of the above.

Steve Seid:
I was listening to an interview you did. You made the comment that you saw a need for an agency in financial services. There was a marketing gap. What was that gap that you saw? And how have you addressed it?

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
Well, that experience was very simple. Like, you have a need, you to go to market to get it and you cannot get it. And you say, okay, let me fill that need in the market. I was the head of marketing and communications for a boutique investment bank. And I was looking for help in implementing my marketing strategies. But I didn't want to have to train the agency on what a hedge fund was, or what an ADR was, and how my traders were working in LATAM. So I started interviewing agencies after agencies, after agencies and they would all come like, yeah, have a finance background, I worked with MasterCard. I'm like, "You cannot compare MasterCard to an investment bank or a hedge fund." So that's where I saw the need.

Steve Seid:
That is phenomenal. So as you just mentioned, you run your own marketing firm. So we're going to call this segment 10 Marketing Questions with Alejandra. So let's start with the first one, what is journey building?

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
I start with the account opening process always because that's the most challenging one in financial services. And I say, your client is not comparing you to another bank, they're not comparing you to another ... Not even like another financial adviser. They're comparing you to Facebook, or to LinkedIn, or to any app that they download. Because that's the experience they have in services now.

Steve Seid:
Right.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
So that's where I start. So there are five phases, awareness, consideration, and then action, and then you have the relationship building and the loyalty, the servicing and the loyalty.

I invite clients always to take a look at the whole journey as a whole to see where the greatest drop is first. Many times the greatest assumption is I need more leads. Everybody says that. And a lot of the times is look, you have, I don't know, 700 leads and then you have three clients. What happened there? Many times, it's about the conversation. And I know we spoke about this the other day, it's about niche building. Why is niche building so important? Because when you have a niche, and you have a clear product that addresses the need of that niche, that conversation will convert that much faster than those 700 will not convert into 3 but will convert into many, many more. So it's about seeing where the biggest drop is. It's about seeing the whole experience that the client goes through.

Kurt Dupuis:
I want to just get a sense of how well are we doing at creating journeys for clients? And I mean financial professionals, and I mean the asset management industry.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
Honestly, the only ones that are actually really looking at the journey are the fintechs because they look at it as a user experience. The problem with the journeys is that most financial advisors or wealth managers, they look at it as the implementation of technology. And it's not about just choosing your platform. Because if you're not doing a good job at analyzing what the process is, no matter what platform you have, you're not going to provide a good service or experience to your client. Many times very, very successful asset managers, they have manual processes. But what happens in the process is what makes the difference. Just having a very clear onboarding email, a very clear step by step servicing. The prioritization and the clarity of your communications comes way before your technology. So that's what a lot of them are getting wrong.

I know you're targeted every single day with different platforms and this is the magic platform that will grow your clients. And everybody forgets to first say, okay, wait, what why do they need it? And how are they being taken care of? And sometimes, the first homework you have is just, okay, let me do at least a sequence of emails that explains what's going to happen for them, or a sequence actually, that interchanges both the email with a human call.
I've told the story before and this is what inspired me to focus on journeys. I had my mortgage broker, I had to get a mortgage for my house, I started looking for a mortgage, I asked for referrals. That's what you do.

Steve Seid:
Right.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
Some friends give me some people. I start calling them. They tell me, just email me your information and I'll get back to you with your pre-qualification, whatever. I was like, "Okay." And then I would email my financial statements. I wasn't comfortable doing that.

Kurt Dupuis:
Yeah.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
And they actually wouldn't get back to me, or call me and say, yeah, it will be one, two days. And then one day, I just googled and I landed in Rocket Mortgage. I don't know if you heard-

Kurt Dupuis:
And they have it down.

Steve Seid:
Yeah.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
They have it down.

Steve Seid:
Yeah.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
They have the platform. Yes. But every single step of the way, I would have somebody call me and explain me what was going on? What it exactly meant.

Steve Seid:
Yeah. This resonates because we've all been in buying processes that were just bad. And you didn't know where you were, and if it went on too long. And we've all been in like really amazing buying processes, where it's like, wow, this is fun. I'm actually enjoying this. And so it's such a great point. Even if you feel like you're doing well here, there's always going to be more opportunities to sort of up your game around customer experience and journeys.

Kurt Dupuis:
We almost have these conversations in silos where we have client acquisition conversations and then client service conversations. There's zero link to them. So I like how that's kind of a fluid from start to finish.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
When I talk about scalability, I always focus on the whole journey because it involves the whole company. You cannot scale and you cannot provide a good client experience and a good customer journey without the whole company. It's not about lead generation, it's not about time servicing, and it's also about the handoff from one to the other. So it has to be integrated. And also what happens with asset managers, they have a very, very high retention rate. Everybody in the industry has ... Very little asset managers or financial advisors lose their clients, right? So we're very spoiled in the industry in a way. Let's say you're Superman asset manager or financial advisor and you take your 50 clients, so giant network, that's it. If you really want to scale, you have to set up a process because if not, it's not going to grow. So basically, you're just betting on the growth of the AUM of your client.

Steve Seid:

So I've heard you talk about creating an easy entry point with marketing. What did you mean by that?

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
So let's say hedge funds. Hedge funds are really hard to convert. You have to grow that trust. But there are products that are easier that they don't need that much of the trust building. That's something that I always recommend. Like, I had one of my interviews with “The Biz of Wealth,” my podcast that I really loved was this woman that specializes only in HENRYs, high earners, not rich yet. And her whole practice is about targeting them. How do you convert them if they don't have money, they don't have enough money for you. If you have the AUM strategy, it's not going to be profitable. So she made this offering that is all about assessments and planning. But I think that is the way to go. Because whoever is in that seat that is not yet attractive to a financial advisor but they are growing, that's the easy product to sell.

Kurt Dupuis:
So with my wife, especially, we talk a lot about values. Like, do we value this? So this costs this, does our value equate to what this costs and vice versa? So you talk a lot about values based branding and I'd love for you to jump in and explain what that means in a business sense.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
For me, values based branding is about what you believe in. And it's just about that, really. It's getting to the core and being ... Never compromise what you believe in. The other day, I was talking to somebody that was not much of a fan of Dave Ramsey. And I was like, that's fine. But that guy, he has a very strong system.

Kurt Dupuis:
You know where he stands. Yeah.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
You know where he stands and he has his followers. So your brand has to permeate.

Kurt Dupuis:
I know when I see something that I resonate with, but building a campaign or building a brand around it is just a different bird. So I'll give you an example. A guy we had on the show last year, James Pollard, he's a marketing guy, he has a newsletter that's subscription based. So when you subscribe to his newsletter, he tells you flat out ... He actually doesn't promote this as much as I probably would. But the first month of the subscription goes to a charity organization that buys books for underserved communities. And I thought, if you have a strong value compass, like what a better way to attract other people with that same value compass, then say, look, look, we're putting our money where our mouth is. So I can only imagine if a financial professional approached Seid and said, we donate our first month's fee to animal shelters in the Bay Area. He'd be like, sign me up twice. I'm in.

Steve Seid:
Yes.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:

Yes.

Steve Seid:
Absolutely.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
For sure.

Steve Seid:
One more follow up on this. So if I'm a financial professional, I'm sitting there and they're nodding their head, I want values based marketing, but how do you assess that? How do you know if you're doing that really well or you're not doing that really well?

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
The other day I was, actually, we were going through a strategic session with one of our clients and he was the founder. And really, I just found myself going through just like a kid, if you have kids you've gone through this, like the why. Okay, but why? Okay, but why? And then ask yourself why again. Until you find that answer that really resonates with what I call your gut, your stomach, don't stop. Don't say, because I want to help people, I want to make the world a better place. I'm like, no, go deeper. And then if that doesn't work, another way of finding it is, and that we work with my client, was what makes you angry? Like, what really sets you up when you see it?

In your case, it must be something about animals. If you see mistreatment of animals, you're going to say, that makes me angry. So why do you do it? So relating the anger with the core, that's where you start with the why. Once you really find the why of why you're doing what you're doing, then you can go about how you do it and then what you do. But once you really have that landed, and really everybody buys into it, and you have a team that really understands that and rolls with you in the same direction, then campaigns are just very easy to create. When it's authentic, you can tell. Like, you were saying, when you were buying ... When it's authentic, you can tell.

Steve Seid:
That's amazing. We got to do that exercise, Kurt, with people, just keep asking them why.

Kurt Dupuis:
Ask them why until they get mad.

Steve Seid:
Is it time for me to go now? Why? But why do I have to go? Okay. In one of your interviews you talked about people moving towards, these are quotes, "the next shiny object in marketing".

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
It's just that with marketing and digital marketing, you have so many things coming out every day. If we talk about like very, very old people before you had the newspapers, and the ads on the streets, and that's about it, maybe the Yellow Pages. And that was as creative as you could get. But now with digital, you have tools, after tools, after tools, after tools that come out and keep distracting you. So what I always propose is you have so much time and so much money, no matter who you are there's limited resources, always. So don't get distracted with everything that comes out, but try to find where your client is. If you have a niche, your numbers are not going to be that huge. And if you know your client, you're going to know where to find them. It's not always about just doing all of your promotions on all the social media platforms or doing everything. Find where they are and you've done something meaningful to engage with you.

Steve Seid:
That's excellent. You brought up something, a big topic for us that I think you can help with, which is niche marketing. So let's say I've gone through the process, I found what I think is the right niche for me, then what do you advise people to do from there?

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
Make that niche smaller.

Steve Seid:
Interesting. So you're saying most of them you see are way too big, and you got to narrow even further? Interesting.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
Yes.

Kurt Dupuis:
I think that's good advice.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
From financial advisors, I always hear retirees.

Kurt Dupuis:
Yeah, right. Doctors.

Steve Seid:
Women.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
Doctors, right. One guy was really good. He was actually ... I spoke to him, he was like, "I specialize in nurses in Florida." That was a good niche.

Steve Seid:
That's specific.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
Very specific. Why? Because you have the laws of Florida, you have the benefits of Florida, he knows the companies, he knows everything. So that was a good one. But journey, yeah, just make it smaller. And once you make it smaller, your conversation is easier. I always use myself as an example. Why? Because I started my business, I didn't do that. I was like, okay, I'm starting on my own, I’ll just do marketing. And then, I helped a friend that had a furniture store. Oh, my god, that was the worst experience of my life. I wanted to do good for them but I had a long learning curve. He just hired me because I was a friend, not because I had experience.

Then once I started talking only to financial professionals and I sat down, they could tell that I knew the business. So the closing rate was much higher. I did not go after the credit cards, I did not go after retail companies. I did not go after large companies either. I specialized in medium and small companies. So when I sit down with them, the conversation is easy. So you have to look for the client with which the conversation is easy, because they are like, oh my God, he understands. I've been helping a client with finding, because I help them with a lot of things, but with finding a CPA. And I realized, I'm like ...

I was listening to a podcast and they were saying the tax code has 74,000 pages. There's no CPA that is going to know what do you need or all of the strategies that you can have. So I need a CPA specialized in a type of business and I'm looking for that. Once I find it, I know I'm going to be able to make the purchase pretty fast. So that's for financial advisers. You need to say, okay, look, if I help doctors, I’ll help surgeons because surgeons have, I don't know, high ticketed insurance needs. So I know everything about insurance for surgeons, let's say. I don't know. But just go deeper.

Kurt Dupuis:
I think that's great advice. I want to talk about content creation. Do you have any wisdom around content creation? I think our clientele is very early in that game, not many advisors are creating their own content. Depending on what firm you’re at, you might not be able to create your own content. But I still think it informs how you communicate with clients.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
I've been in content creation my whole life, been a journalist too. There are two things. One, whenever you start a content marketing strategy journey, you go too big. Get that list and you say, okay, I'm going to start my content marketing, and you start cutting in half. And then cutting half again. Because you say, I'm going to do one blog post a week, and I'm going to post every week. No. You know it's not going to happen. And journey, it's around the beginning of the year, they say. That's my objective and then that never happens. So be realistic, first, with content creation. Second, don't try to compete with the big ones and don't try to make a strategy that is going to generate leads. Make a strategy that is going to make your current leads more loyal.

Kurt Dupuis:
Clients. Got you. Convert your existing leads.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
Yes.

Kurt Dupuis:
There's a serious theme in this whole conversation, which is drill down. Find your why, ask more questions. Simon Sinek the hell out of this. Niche marketing, drill down, content strategies, drill down. So that's like the, I'm getting ahead of ourselves, but that's like the takeaway of this conversation is, you're way too broad, drill down.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
Yeah. And with the content marketing, with journey. We have a flow, for example, that we have designed that is very simple. We only create one piece of content a month. And I know it sounds ... Like whenever I present, they're like, what? You're going to give me one piece of content? It's like, too little.

Kurt Dupuis:
But it's probably really good, though.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
That piece of content has to be good. But then repurpose it. There is nothing wrong with repurposing that article that you wrote into social media posts, into your blog post, into your LinkedIn, into your newsletter, into a catch up email with your clients in your CRM. And then the catch is, generally, we do a webinar based on that piece of content, or a podcast. And then if you need a lead generation process, use that podcast or that webinar as your lead generation. So that webinar will give your prospects an excuse to engage with you. And that's a whole new system that you activate into your lead generation process. So just creating content and expecting clients to come in and contact you, yeah, that doesn't work anymore.

Steve Seid:
Yeah. Kurt and I got to get better at that. We create each episode, we've got, what is it, 36 now, Kurt? And we post it once. And we send one email about each individual episode and a lot of people are listening. But we need to do the follow up. We need to create that LinkedIn post two months later, that's like, hey, have you seen this?

Kurt Dupuis:
I just wrote that down too actually.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
You should also do segments, extract little quotes, your segments or your posts, extract conclusions. And then whatever made you think of whoever, like whatever client on our conversation, you may have thought of some clients, send them that segment and say, hey, I just thought of you because of this. There are a lot of things that you can do with one piece of content. So that's my content marketing strategy.

Steve Seid:
Fantastic.

Kurt Dupuis:
Love it.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
Sorry. There is one thing that I also want to recommend that is very important that I work with clients always in content marketing. There are people that like to read and there are people that I like to write, there are people who like to speak, there are people that like to just do video. Most people love video, we've seen that. The trends show, of course, that everybody consumes video. I'm, for example, the exception. I don't like video. I like to read. But the key for content marketing generation is to do it in the format that's easy for you.

I've had too many clients are hate writing. I love writing. They hate writing and I cannot give you a piece of content. And then we ended up doing a podcast or actually sometimes they even send me like WhatsApp audios with ideas. And then that's easy to convert into content. Or my partner, for example, she's great at doodling. So we're doing some videos with her like doing graphics while she writes and explains a concept. So find the format that's easy for you to share your content. That's key.

Steve Seid:
Well, we're up to our final question, 10 questions, and you've been doing an awesome job. Here's a final one. So I'm a financial professional. And I decide, hey, I want to sit down and really develop a true marketing strategy, define some of the concepts that we're talking about. What should that process look like for them? And what are some of the things that they should think about?

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
It's a whole process that we do. Phase number one, find your core value offering and who do you offer it to? Phase number two, compare yourself in the market, compare yourself to how the others present themselves in terms of messaging, and find your space. Phase number three, define your, what we call the content pillars. What do you talk about? What does your brand and yourself speak about? What is consistent throughout? What's your flag? What do you defend? What do you teach? And that's going to be what we call the content pillars. Then find, I always recommend not more than two targets, not more than two stakeholders, and define how you're going to reach them. And do a calendar of communications and actions that's going to take you to engage with them.

Just recently, for example, we started working with a client and we saw ... He engaged with us for lead generation. And throughout the process, we discovered, no, you don't need lead generation, you actually need to sell more to your current clients. And that's very common too. So when you find your stakeholders, define who they are, find two, and then do a calendar of communications based on the first three phases that I spoke about.

Steve Seid:
Really, really insightful stuff. I mean, this marketing piece is something that we all need to get much better at, us included, but certainly our clients. So we really appreciate you coming on. Tell everyone how they find you, what you're working on, about your podcast. Give us all that.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
Well, my podcast is thebizofwealth.com. You can check it out. And then my company is Scalto.com, S-C-A-L-T-O.com. And you can find me everywhere. I'm the only one. Alejandra Slatapolsky is very easy to find me on social media. So go ahead and reach out.

Steve Seid:
Absolutely fantastic. And I think, Kurt, are you and I doing her show at some point in the future? We're going to actually have to talk to us, talk through our story in about two knuckleheads that created a podcast as wholesalers.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
It's going to be very fun.

Steve Seid:
Alejandro, thank you so, so much. We really appreciate it.

Kurt Dupuis:
Yes thank you.

Alejandra Slatapolsky:
No, thank you guys. I had a lot of fun.

Kurt Dupuis:
Awesome.

Steve Seid:
We will be back with the Costanza Corner. This is The Whole Truth. Stick with us.

Kurt Dupuis:
And welcome back to our closing segment that we call the Costanza Corner where we like to end the show on a high note. Steve, take it away.

Steve Seid:
So not always when it comes to climate and climate change, not always a lot of positive stuff. There was an article that came out this week about the state of the ice shelf. What I'd want to do is talk about the plus side, the solutions, and there are a lot of them coming our way. So here's something that just happened. A United Airlines flight from Chicago O'Hare to DC Reagan National that’s nothing to write home about, but the 100 people who were aboard United's recent Wednesday service were part of aviation history. They were on the first passenger aircraft flight ever to be powered by 100% plant based jet fuel. So did you hear that?

Kurt Dupuis:
No.

Steve Seid:
Yeah, Yeah. It's designed by I guess a company called Virent, V-I-R-E-N-T, and derived from agricultural wastes like corn cobs and stalks.

Kurt Dupuis:
No kidding!

Steve Seid:
I wonder if they knew when they got on the flight that they were the first but it was really just corn that was flying this jet.

Kurt Dupuis:

It might require an extra Xanax or something if people knew about it.

Steve Seid:
Yeah. But that's pretty darn cool that a lot of these alternative fuels are becoming a reality, and I don't know how far off we are until their becoming mainstream. But that's good news to me.

Kurt Dupuis:
That's good news. I always like the “science” Costanza Corners just showing how we're pushing boundaries there. In my Neanderthal brain, I just keep thinking of the movie ice age because my kids watch that.

Steve Seid:
Yeah. When I see this stuff and like the treatments for cancer that are coming through and all these things, I love my child but I'm like-

Kurt Dupuis:
Alzheimer's. All kinds of stuff.

Steve Seid:
Some people just have way more important jobs than I do, I will tell you right now, in the development of these technologies. But anyways, this made me smile, we hope it made you smile as well. Thanks for listening. We'll see you next time.

Kurt Dupuis:
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